Airtasker

The way we do business is changing fast and those that fail to adapt can often get left behind. It’s amazing to think that Facebook is for old people now and a Blackberry is an antique. Every company will go through peaks and troughs of success, but one thing will always be in fashion – the adoption of clever solutions to make business more efficient and effective.

Smart entrepreneurs are tackling their changing human resources needs through technology, which is why online outsourcing is such a big trend. At my company Airtasker, we specialise in outsourcing to locals, which lets businesses find staff for location-based work, as well as remote jobs.

We are privileged to see how some of the most creative companies are using connected labour to power their businesses – no matter their size. Here are 18 tasks that smart Australian businesses are outsourcing to get an edge:

businessspectator.com.au

Airtasker raises $2 million for renewed micro-task push

Australian online outsourcing platform Airtasker has raised in another $2 million in funding and is set to ramp up its efforts to promote the short-term labour market.

Unlike other job platforms, Airtasker specialises in advertising micro-jobs – tasks that typically require even less of a formal commitment from the employee than a regular casual job. It could be anything from delivering food to cleaning homes.

Though, as reported by the Australian Financial Review, the company’s founder Tim Fung is looking to expand his service in the new to cater to large corporates looking for day workers.

The move was foreshadowed by a partnership between online job platform CareerOne and Airtasker earlier this year. As part of the arrangement, CareerOne has already started promoting Airtasker as a hub for casual workers.

Airtasker has picked up AU$2 million from a number of investors, bringing its total capital to AU$3.5 million.

Exto Partners, BridgeLane Capital, and a number of private angel investors are backing the company, which helps businesses and individuals find someone to complete short-term errands or tasks.

It is currently further targeting the temporary recruitment industry.

"We are seeing businesses demand greater flexibility in the way they recruit talent in order to stay nimble and competitive," Airtasker co-founder and CEO Tim Fung said in a statement.

Techworld.com.au

Airtasker snags $2 million in funding round

Sydney startup Airtasker has raised another $2 million in capital as it continues to grow its task-based work online marketplace.

The funding came from Exto Partners, BridgeLane Capital and private angel investors, Airtasker said. In total, Airtasker has now raised $3.5 million.

Airtasker helps people or businesses find workers for a specific task. A “sender” can post a task – deliveries, house cleaning or computer tasks, for example – and then potential “runners” bid for the chance to complete the job.

In July, Airtasker signed a partnership with CareerOne under which CareerOne will post casual work offers from Airtasker. The tasks will be listed alongside CareerOne’s traditional job tasks.

Airtasker also recently appointed Mitchell Harper, co-founder and CEO of BigCommerce, as an advisor.

Airtasker, an online marketplace for outsourcing short-term jobs, has closed a $2 million funding round with Exto Partners, BridgeLane Capital and a range of private equity investors. This brings their investment total to $3.5 million.

The funds will be used to drive a team expansion to back their aggressive growth strategy in the increasingly crowded outsourcing industry.

Co-founder and chief executive Tim Fung told StartupSmart most of the funds will go into doubling their development team of five people.

“We’re going to start spending a bit of money to make sure we turn up in the right search engine results, but the majority will go towards head count, especially in engineering,” says Fung.

Launched in 2012, community members can post and accept tasks and negotiate a price. Airtasker takes 15% of the final price of the task.

It is currently used to outsource menial tasks like picking up dry cleaning and or basic household chores, but Australian technology start-up AirTasker is gearing up its army of 85,000 freelancers in a bid to take on the $20 billion corporate temporary recruitment sector.

It recently closed a $2 million funding round from capital funds, including Sydney-based private equity vehicle and existing investor BridgeLane Capital. The round brought total investment in the company to $3.5 million to date and valued it at $10 million.

The funding would be used to hire more engineering staff, Mr Fung said, as well as explore ways of expanding operations globally.

It comes after Freelancer, also based in Australia, saw its share price sky-rocket this month from an initial public offering of 50c to $1.48, valuing the company at $645 million.

“It proves that the online outsourcing model is something that’s here to stay and can be a very interesting business once it’s built out to liquidity,” Mr Fung said.

afrsmartinvestor.com.au

Aussie startup aims to shake up $20b temp recruitment market

It is currently used to outsource menial tasks like picking up dry cleaning and or basic household chores, but Australian technology start-up AirTasker is gearing up its army of 85,000 freelancers in a bid to take on the $20 billion corporate temporary recruitment sector.

It recently closed a $2 million funding round from capital funds, including Sydney-based private equity vehicle and existing investor BridgeLane Capital. The round brought total investment in the company to $3.5 million to date and valued it at $10 million.

The funding would be used to hire more engineering staff, Mr Fung said, as well as explore ways of expanding operations globally.

It comes after Freelancer, also based in Australia, saw its share price sky-rocket this month from an initial public offering of 50c to $1.48, valuing the company at $645 million.

“It proves that the online outsourcing model is something that’s here to stay and can be a very interesting business once it’s built out to liquidity,” Mr Fung said.

It is currently used to outsource menial tasks like picking up dry cleaning and or basic household chores, but Australian technology start-up AirTasker is gearing up its army of 85,000 freelancers in a bid to take on the $20 billion corporate temporary recruitment sector.

It recently closed a $2 million funding round from capital funds, including Sydney-based private equity vehicle and existing investor BridgeLane Capital. The round brought total investment in the company to $3.5 million to date and valued it at $10 million.

The funding would be used to hire more engineering staff, Mr Fung said, as well as explore ways of expanding operations globally.

It comes after Freelancer, also based in Australia, saw its share price sky-rocket this month from an initial public offering of 50c to $1.48, valuing the company at $645 million.

“It proves that the online outsourcing model is something that’s here to stay and can be a very interesting business once it’s built out to liquidity,” Mr Fung said.

This emerging sharing economy includes marketplaces such as eBay and Gumtree, car-sharing services such as GoGet, bike-sharing services including the likes of Melbourne Bike Share, peer-to-peer rental services such as Open Shed, errand services including Airtasker and clothes-swapping services such as the Clothing Exchange. Many more start-ups focusing on diverse products and services are operating in Australia.

Tim Fung is the founder and CEO of Airtasker, a peer-to-peer task outsourcing platform that has over 65,000 users across Australia. East Coast Global Curator, Melissa O’Young, interviewed Tim when she visited Australia in November.

1. How is Airtasker disrupting the Australian job market?

When you look at the structure of the job market today, it’s really quite inflexible. Most jobs are specifically pre-defined like “accounting”, “carpentry” or “removalist”, however, many tasks that people need done are not as defined, for example tasks like “assemble IKEA furniture” or “make decorations for party”. Airtasker is changing this by allowing people and businesses to post a task, and then allowing local community members to earn additional money by completing these tasks. By creating more liquidity in the job market, we can provide our users with opportunities to earn a good living and we’re adding real economic value by making the most of an underutilised resource – people’s spare time, experience and skills.

About 6 months after launching and observing the tasks posted, we saw a clear trend towards “casualisation” of the workforce – with both companies and employees looking for ways to create a flexible lifestyle. At Airtasker, we are providing the platform to facilitate this flexibility which we believe will make the labour marketplace much more efficient.

greenvillages.com.au

Virtual assistants

A familiar dilemma. A savvy solution. “Jono and I were moving: packing, unpacking, cleaning up, setting up. We couldn’t call our friends – beer and a pizza to help didn’t cut it – yet we knew there were people out there who could do it faster and better… if we could only find them.”

So Tim Fung, 29, and Jon Lui, 28, hatched Airtasker, an online market for tasks busy or unqualified people want outsourced to the expert and willing. “We posted ads on university noticeboards,” recalls Fung. “And hundreds applied –mostly cash-poor students between classes – and began work on data entry, packing boxes, building IKEA tables.”

Australia-based peer-to-peer task outsourcing platform Airtasker has partnered with internet job search website CareerOne to make short-term work opportunities available to full-time job seekers.

Based in Sydney, Airtasker allows anyone to outsource their everyday tasks such as deliveries, office work or odd jobs to other runners to complete these tasks. This model is made popular by US based TaskRabbit, a model that a lot of us are familiar with in Singapore. Airtasker generates revenue by taking a 15 percent commission of the final price agreed between the task owner and the runner.

Abc

Taking the economy to task

Television interview with Airtasker on ABC News Business Today.

Tim Fung, CEO of Airtasker, discusses how the task economy is reshaping the way people work and the job market as a whole.

ONLINE task sourcing site Airtasker will join forces with job seeking site CareerOne to offer temporary task work to those seeking longer-term jobs.

Airtasker is a website for short-term tasks. It may be weeding the front-lawn of a person’s home for $25, or picking up a package and delivering it for $70, or formatting an HTML table on a user’s website for $5. Creating 3D drawings for a real estate firm can earn you $400, retouching some photos $30, or washing someone’s car $15. These are among tasks currently advertised.

Under a joint agreement, CareerOne’s 1.3 million monthly job seekers will be paired with Airtasker’s relevant task-based employment opportunities while searching for full-time jobs on CareerOne.

On-line Australian start-up Airtasker has joined forces with internet job search website CareerOne to make short-term work opportunities available to full-time job seekers.

Airtasker, which was founded last year, connects people and businesses seeking to outsource everyday tasks such as deliveries, office work or odd jobs around the house with trusted, reliable people able to complete those tasks.

Under the partnership, CareerOne’s 1.3 million monthly job seekers will be paired up with relevant task-based employment opportunities on Airtasker while searching for full-time jobs on CareerOne.

crn.com.au

Airtasker partners with CareerOne for short term jobs

Local recruitment startup Airtasker has announced a partnership with recruitment site CareerOne that will enable to companies to offer small, short-term projects to candidates looking for full-time work in a manner which is integrated into the search results.

The service is expected to be particularly appealing to the tech sector, where short term projects abound, and where start-ups, or new corporate ventures lack the budgets to take on full time employees.

Airtasker indicated that in Australia, the top tasks on its site include have a strong IT bent with website and blog assistance, and computer and IT Support among the most popular tasks. These are typically valued at between $US70 ($A76) and $US90 ($A98) per task for 95 per cent of all tasks being assigned within one day,” according to the company.

The move also reflects the expansion of the casual recruitment economy. According to Karen Lawson, CareerOne CEO, “As we see the incredible growth of more flexible and what could only be called casual job opportunities in the workplace, CareerOne working together with Airtasker provides a way for Australian job seekers to tap into all types of employment opportunities in one place and employers to build a more dynamic network of individuals for jobs of all sizes.”

Australian find-a person-to-do-anything-service Airtasker says that IT-related tasks are amongst the most popular requests from its workforce. Would you be happy to enhance your career or supplement your income by helping strangers set up their web server?

In an announcement of a new strategic alliance with job search site CareerOne, Airtasker revealed that “website & blog assistance” and “IT support” are two of its most active requests. A typical task pays between $70 and $90 and can be completed in less than a day, the company says.

Online job board CareerOne will begin listing tasks like house cleaning and furniture assembly in the coming weeks under a new partnership with Sydney start-up Airtasker.

Airtasker launched early last year with about $1.5 million of external funding. It lets people bid for small, freelance jobs in exchange for 15% of the agreed-upon fee.

Under the new agreement, CareerOne will include Airtasker tasks in its job searches: for example, a search for a job in the IT industry may yield tasks like setting up a WordPress website or fixing up a home computer among more conventional results.
Airtasker founder and CEO Tim Fung said tasks would appear on both Airtasker’s website and CareerOne. The latter boasts 1.3 million job seekers a month.

Itwire_logo

AirTasker buddies up with CareerOne

CareerOne today announced it has joined forces with fast growing Aussie start-up Airtasker, making short-term employment opportunities available to those searching for full-time work.

The ‘task economy’, championed by Airtasker, matches businesses and individuals who are searching for short-term or casual staff with members of the local community who can complete tasks such as office administration, photography or deliveries.

Under the new deal, CareerOne’s 1.3 million monthly job seekers will be paired up with Airtasker’s relevant task-based employment opportunities while searching for full-time jobs on CareerOne.

By developing a single jobs resource, the two companies have created what they describe as "a new way for job seekers to monetise their time and skills", while providing employers with ready and immediate access to a scalable and available talent pool.

Job posting website CareerOne.com.au will post casual work offers through a partnership announced today with Sydney startup, Airtasker.

Whereas CareerOne has previously focussed on full-time job postings, the agreement with Airtasker means its job categories will also include task-based work such as deliveries, house cleaning or computer errands. Airtasker is a website that allows people or businesses to post tasks that potential “runners” can bid to complete.

Under the partnership, Airtasker tasks will be listed alongside CareerOne’s traditional job posts when a user searches for work on the CareerOne website. Airtasker, which works out of its co-working space Tank Stream Labs in the Sydney CBD, will remain an independent company under the arrangement, Airtasker CEO Tim Fung told Techworld Australia.

CareerOne, today announced it has combined forces with fast growing local start-up Airtasker to make short-term employment opportunities available to those searching for full-time work for the first time under a single jobs resource.

The ‘task economy’, championed by Airtasker, matches businesses and individuals who are searching for short-term or casual staff with members of the local community who can complete tasks such as office administration, photography or deliveries. Under the agreement, CareerOne’s 1.3 million monthly job seekers will be paired up with Airtasker’s relevant task-based employment opportunities while searching for full-time jobs on CareerOne. By developing a single jobs resource, CareerOne and Airtasker are creating a new way for job seekers to monetise their time and skills, while providing employers with ready and immediate access to a scalable and available talent pool.

Airtasker Founder and CEO Tim Fung said, “Working with CareerOne will offer job seekers an opportunity to monetise their unique skills and available time by completing short-term tasks while hunting for full-time jobs.”

businessspectator.com.au

CareerOne partners with Airtasker to corner casual jobs market

Job seeking site, CareerOne has joined forces with start-up Airtasker, in a bid to corner the short-term, casual job market. The agreement will see CareerOne promote Airtasker’s micro-jobs to its 1.3 million job seeker network.

Jobs on Airtasker range from coffee runs through to casual construction jobs, and according to CareerOne can be used by job seekers to buffer their income while pursuing full-time employment.

"Employers, whether they be businesses or individuals are increasingly looking for people to help with individual tasks or short-term projects,” CareerOne CEO Karen Lawson said. “The burgeoning ‘task economy’ is a natural extension of the online job market and we see plenty of opportunity for both job seekers and employers to benefit by making it easier for them to connect.”

ideashoist.com.au

Tim and Jonathan – cofounders of Airtasker

Jonathan is a co-founder and COO of Airtasker and an avid supporter of the Australian start-up scene as a founder of Tank Stream Labs. Jonathan was a founding team member and the project manager for amaysim, a web-based MVNO, which achieved one of the fastest telecommunications service provider roll outs in Australia. Prior to joining the founding team of amaysim, Jonathan worked at IBM for 4 years as a network consultant and project manager. Jonathan has a B. Telecommunications Engineering (Data Networking) from UNSW and in 2007, co-authored a paper “Wireless LAN based Indoor Positioning” which has been presented internationally.

Theage_au_logo

Outsourcing your life

Finding there are not enough hours in the day to feed and clothe yourself, let alone fit in some exercise and spend time with your nearest and dearest? You're not alone. An increasing number of Australians are outsourcing everything - from cleaning, to buying an iPad and even proposing marriage.

About one-third of all household activities are now outsourced, according to Phil Ruthven, chairman of business information analyst firm IBISWorld. “We think about $300 billion will be spent this year by households,” he says. “That's what we now spend on outsourcing services that we used to do ourselves, everything from house cleaning to laundry, child-minding, eating out, paying for holidays instead of staying with friends.”

Sydney bloke Roman Cortes was on to a good thing recently when he hired three people to help execute a marriage proposal with a difference. The "runners" contracted via the Airtasker website wore t-shirts saying “will”, “you” and “marry” (the would-be groom completed the sentence). Fortunately the answer was yes, says Airtasker co-founder Tim Fung, whose website has spawned $1 million in jobs since it launched in March last year.

qantas.com.au

Talking Business with Alan Kohler (June)

Alan Kohler is the founder of Business Spectator, a business news and financial commentary website. He is also the ABC's finance reporter and founder of the online investing publication Eureka Report. Alan's guests include...

Australian startup community heavyweights evaluated 100 budding businesses in a fast-paced SydStart ‘pitchfest’ competition this week. Applications were judged on target market, innovation, traction, defensibility and team. Winners received mentoring, tech gadgets and co-working space.

Here were the top five: AirTasker: Outsource everyday chores
AirTasker is a location-based Freelancer.com for errands: think cleaning up after a party, a lift to the airport or assembling Ikea furniture. It was launched by Sydneysiders Tim Fung and Jonathan Lui in February 2012 and attracted $1.5 million in funding within two months of launch. Users can post jobs, or browse and bid on available jobs. Airtasker employs seven people and processes about $120,000 worth of jobs per month.

Everyone’s had a time where they wished they could pay someone to do a chore for them. Maybe it was to fetch a slab during the grand final, maybe it was to break up with a partner, whatever the case, in all likelihood that person wasn’t there to do it for you.

But thanks to out-of-the-box thinking Sydney start-up AirTasker, that’s all changed. The beers can be on ice and you can have your washing picked up without ever lifting a finger.

Airtasker is a community marketplace where people advertise tasks they need done, and a team of ‘Runners’ bid to do them.

Think about it as the eBay of chores.

Yahoonews

The Best Startups This Year

The big wigs of new business gathered at SydStart this week to find Australia’s best new startup. The ‘pitchfest’ competition saw over 100 new businesses sell their wares to industry pros with presentations judged on target market, innovation, traction, defensibility and team.

To the winners went mentoring, tech gadgets and co-working spaces, while the losers were left to lament their suddenly hole ridden business plans.

AirTasker came a close second in the pitching comp with their business outsourcing the daily tasks people don’t want to do. Basically, it’s a community marketplace where people advertise tasks they need done, and a team of ‘Runners’ bid to do them. It’s a bit like the eBay of chores.

The business is the one of many new outfits inspired by the idea of collaborative consumption, the economic model based on sharing, swapping, bartering, trading or renting something rather than owning it. Founded by Sydneysiders Tim Fung and Jonathan Lui in February last year, the common problem solving startup pulled in $1.5 million in funding within two months of launch.

Techcrunch-green

Airtasker Wants To Be oDesk Of Southeast Asia

Australian startup, Airtasker, is keen to expand out of its home country into Southeast Asia, which it says hasn’t been touched by large competitors yet.

The year-old startup provides job matching for freelancers and employers, similar to what oDesk and Elance do. For its first steps outside of Australia, its first port of call will be Singapore, where it wants to hire two country managers.

Airtasker joins a scene that already has a few huge competitors. oDesk, for example, has been around since 2005. Last year, the company raised $15 million, bringing its total funding $45 million to date. The site processes $300 million in jobs on an annual basis.

paulwallbank.com

Airtasker’s crazy idea

“Anyone who says something is crazy these days is crazy themselves,” says Jonathan Lui, the founder of Sydney based startup Airtasker.

The crazy idea Jonathan shares with co-founder Tim Fung is to create a global marketplace for small tasks.

If you need someone to walk your dog, do some gardening or be an extra in elaborate marriage proposal then Airtasker is a site to find the right person.

Since launching last year Airtasker has advertised more than 54,000 tasks with users looking for everything from dog walkers to computer repairers and actors.

dropboxusercontent.com

Up to the Task

On-demand errand sites are matchmaking the time poor to a vast army of willing and flexible workers.

Techworld.com.au

Australian startup snapshot: Airtasker

After turning one year old, Sydney's Airtasker is considering expanding its online marketplace for contract jobs overseas, according to co-founders Tim Fung and Jonathan Lui. However, Fung and Lui wants to keep its HQ and said it’s critical Australia promotes an ecosystem that keeps startups Down Under.

The Pitch:
Airtasker helps people or businesses find workers for a specific task. A “sender” can post a task—deliveries, house cleaning or computer tasks, for example—and then potential “runners” bid for the chance to complete the job.

Ninemsn

The TODAY Show, 11 April 2013

We all have household chores we loathe - be it cleaning the gutters, scrubbing the shower or maybe assembling IKEA furniture. But now, there's a website called "Airtasker" which allows you to outsource these jobs to strangers for a price.

The co-founder and CEO, Tim Fung joined us on TODAY to tell us about Airtasker.

Go to the websites direct here: https://www.airtasker.com/

Uts-logo

Share and share alike

Tim Fung is co-founder with Jonathan Lui, and chief executive of, the Sydney-based errands and odd jobs network Airtasker. “In certain categories collaborative consumption is an absolute no-brainer,” Fung says, citing house sharing, car sharing and services generally. “I don’t think it takes anyone too visionary to assume that.”

Fung says the Airtasker “community” comprises about 43,000 people and in its first 12 months it notched up more than 7000 jobs valued at about $600,000 (see separate story).

Werecommend

HELP IS ON ITS WAY: AIRTASKER

First up, we want to say we don’t know the people who run the Australian website Airtasker. We’re not investors, acquainances or distant relatives. It’s just a great idea and we think you should know about it.

The Airtasker team (who launched their site in February 2012) explain the way their service works on the front page of the site, but in essence it’s this: If you have a task you want done, or you want to perform a task for money, you can connect with others through Airtasker. There is a list of rules so that people conduct themselves nicely, and users can review and rate one another. It has some elements in common with the popular Airbnb accommodation service, the American service Task Rabbit, and the granddaddy of them all, Craigslist.

Yourtechlife

Your Tech Life – #183 – Webcast

A year on just how is Airtasker going? Odd Jobs to do, get them done by random strangers! Airtasker is going gangbusters. Kogan Mobile has taken its Telstra Whoeslaler to court – just what’s going on with your access and the future of Kogan Mobile? Click Frenzy is back – will it work? Vodafone is going 4G, your calls on Routers, Wifi, Tablets, Phone Choice, Internet choice and one from left field – a time capsule satellite – is it real? will it happen? this is one CRAZY but possibly Awesome idea. I just can’t work out if its real!

Enjoy! Get in touch – be part of Your Tech Life – call 1800 157 157 and leave a message – a problem with technology, or a question if you need advice on technology, or email me here on the website.

Screen_shot_2013-03-12_at_11.18.42_am

For a start, think hard work

THE internet is an indispensable daily tool for business, but it's also proving fertile ground for new enterprises. While it has streamlined processes and communication for existing companies, the global network has also spawned a raft of start-up firms that could not have existed without it.

For Sydney-based start-up Airtasker, it is the primary channel for growth at home and overseas. The company is based on a deceptively simple idea: put people who need tasks done together with others happy to carry them out. "It's like a mobile bulletin board for casual or part-time jobs," says Airtasker co-founder and chief executive Tim Fung. "There are heaps of people out there looking for jobs, but there's been no way to put them in touch with those who need them."

Screen_shot_2013-03-12_at_11.19.43_am

Home help goes digital

Working mother of three Sarah Spiteri is happy she no longer has to spend every weekend nagging her husband to do chores. Now when she wants the lawn mowed or another job completed she posts the tasks on an outsourcing website and pays someone to do it.

In Australia, a man desperate for someone to pretend to be his girlfriend offered $100 on the Airtasker outsourcing website. ''I need someone to meet my mum and pretend to be my girlfriend,'' he wrote. ''She's been pushing really hard to get me to find a girlfriend and I'm sick of it.'' In January, a group of tennis fans at the Australian Open found a runner through another outsourcing service to stand in food and drink queues for them for $29 an hour so they could watch the tennis.

When an American company makes a successful product, Australians are usually busting to get their hands on it.

We look forward to shiny new tech toys as much as the latest episode of Game of Thrones. Unfortunately there are hurdles to accessing cutting edge technology that even a VPN and high-speed broadband can't solve.

Aussies have a strong thirst for innovation and despite a comparatively small population there's a number of entrepreneurs tailoring technology specifically for the hungry Aussie market.

Five of these companies (Sidekicker, Airtasker, WeTeachMe, PetHomeStay and Pocketbook) reflect on the advantages and disadvantages they've encountered as they bring home some of the products that have been successful elsewhere.

In our personal lives, it seems that people are returning in droves to old-school market behaviours of renting, swapping and lending goods and services instead of buying them.

The growth of the “collaborative consumption” movement or the “sharing economy,” supported by the social fabric of the connected internet is growing at a scale and speed never thought possible.

Human Resources: Many small businesses need to hire extra staff for short-term projects such as promotional work, mystery shopping or event staffing. The collaborative consumption movement allows businesses to easily access a scalable, on-demand local workforce as needed. For example, Airtasker is a service that helps businesses hire anywhere from one person to help unpack boxes for a day to a team of one thousand Airtaskers to conduct an Australia wide mystery shopping project.

Abc

THE RISE OF MICRO-LABOUR

Micro-labour isn’t a clever way of describing a recalcitrant colleague’s deficient work practices. And it has nothing to do with nano-technology either. It's about using the Internet to outsource small tasks to eager workers – sort of like a digital notice-board for odd jobs and errands. It sounds like the perfect way to earn extra income. But could its growing popularity erode working conditions and lead to exploitation?

Tim Fung is putting Australians to work through his start-up AirTasker, where busy people can outsource the mundane parts of their personal lives to others and business can find instant help for duties such as dropping flyers or data entry. The site lets people bid to complete the odd jobs on offer.

Dropbox-logo

BRW: Share Out, Scale Up and Earn Away

Airtasker is a relatively new addition to the ecosystem here. Like the more established TaskRabbit in the US, Airtasker hooks up people who have some spare time with people who need to have work done.

Finance company receptionist Teresa Hong does between one and 10 tasks a week depending on her spare time. Some are quite random. “There’s a lady who gets these cravings for charcoal chicken,” Hong says.

“She doesn’t give much notice but she gets a craving and asks somebody to get her a quarter-chicken from a specific shop in Padstow [in Sydney].”

She’s done gardening, delivered furniture, sold items on eBay and, curiously, erased answers written on a second-hand exam paper. She mostly does it for fun, but there is a knack to picking plum jobs and some of them pay handsomely. She once made almost $400 by assembling a treadmill, which took around four hours. Regulars such as Hong with a good track record can cash in on their reputation to charge more for jobs.

Choice_logo_web

Bring in the Airtaskers

Got a small job you need doing quickly? You might want to try posting your job on airtasker.com – an online service that works like a virtual community noticeboard. It connects you with people living near you who can help with any number of tasks from housework and IT assistance to being a rent-a-crowd for up-and-coming musicians.

It works like this – post your task on the Airtasker website, stating what you need doing, when you need it done, and how much you’ll pay.

Airtaskers near you will send you an offer to do your tasks. You check their online profiles before choosing the person you think is best for the job. Once they’ve completed a job you can also leave an online recommendation for them – much like eBay.

While the company says it has installed safety features – it takes Airtaskers' credit card details and checks them out – exercise caution when you’re meeting people online. Ask for identification and check their online reviews.

If you need an easy way to outsource small jobs locally, Airtasker might be worth looking into.

Airtasker is a Web site where small businesses or individuals can list a specific task that needs completing to over 43,000 Australians who have signed up to offer services via the site.

The people completing tasks on the website might do it as a part-time job. Think of it as eBay meets traditional job classifieds.

To post a task you assign a task category - like office admin, delivery or IT support - enter the description of what needs to be done, location of the task and how much you will pay for the job to be completed.

Dropbox-logo

BRW: Who's Disrupting Your Industry?

Services: Airtasker

Sydney-based online start-up Airtasker hopes to become the middleman for odd jobs - the kinds of things that you now find advertised in local paper classifieds, community notice boards and online forums.

Founded in February 2012, it connects people who want to outsource daily tasks with people who can complete them. It raised $1.5million in funding last year from BridgeLane Capital and other investors, and has just acquired a smaller rival TaskBox. In its first year it matched workers to $600,000 worth of jobs.

Screen_shot_2013-03-13_at_11.09.39_am

Eagle Startups – Thursday 14th February, 2013

Tim & Jonathan came up with the idea for Airtasker in 2011 when Tim was moving apartments and had so many chores and errands that needed completing: from packing boxes to end-of-bond cleaning to assembling flat pack furniture. They had seen what was happening in the local, mobile economy and thought that there had to be a place where people could find other people to help them with these types of tasks, especially when there were so many people looking for jobs!
Airtasker has recently joined forces with Taskbox, we had Tim from Airtasker and James from Taskbox join us in the studio today.

Lifehacker_logo

Pay A Stranger To Sort Out Valentine’s Day

You’ve forgotten Valentine’s Day again, haven’t you? Time to make a decision: do you scramble for a meaningful gift in a desperate, last-minute frenzy? Do you hand over some tatty supermarket flowers and accept your fate with a rueful grin? Or do you launch into a clearly improvised diatribe against the commercialisation of romance and hope for the best? Alternatively, you could pay someone else a small fee to sort the whole thing out for you.

Airtasker is an online crowdsourcing service that lets you advertise bespoke tasks to “runners” who will then carry it out for a small fee. To use Airtasker, you simply post on the site, listing what you want done and what you’re willing to pay. Runners in the local area can then agree to perform the task, or haggle over the price. Posting a task is free, with Airtasker taking a cut of the runner’s fee.

Australian services marketplace start-up Airtasker today announced that it has acquired collaborative consumption business TaskBox, a company that also connects individuals and businesses seeking to outsource everyday tasks to reliable and trusted people who can complete those tasks. TaskBox Co-Founders James Mather and Nick Roberts will join Airtasker as Team Advisors and be responsible for business development and growth as the company continues to expand its peer-based outsourcing smartphone app and website.

Sydney-based start-up Airtasker has made its first acquisition after launching just one year ago, picking up smaller competitor TaskBox, as it seeks to ramp up growth here and overseas.

Founded in February 2012, Airtasker is an online start-up that connects people seeking to outsource everyday tasks and errands with trusted, reliable people who can complete those tasks.

In April last year, Airtasker secured $1.5 million in funding from Bridge Lane Capital and a number of other unknown investors. The start-up had already raised $140,000 from internet investors and entrepreneurs in order to get off the ground.

Now, just one year after it was founded, Airtasker has acquired fellow Sydney-based start-up TaskBox for an undisclosed sum.

Businessspectator

Airtasker acquires local rival TaskBox

Australian start-up Airtasker has acquired its online rival, TaskBox for an undisclosed amount.

The move will see the website, which serves as an online marketplace for outsourcing jobs, expand its reach within Australia. TaskBox has already started redirecting its users to Airtasker’s site.

As a result of the acquisition TaskBox co-founders James Mather and Nick Roberts will join Airtasker as team advisors and will be responsible for further growing the business.

Airtasker has acquired fellow startup TaskBox. Both companies offer a platform for people to outsource everyday jobs such as house cleaning, pickups and deliveries of items.

Airtasker co-founder Tim Fung said the partnership will allow the startup to expand its services through the experience that TaskBox co-founders James Mather and Nick Roberts bring to the market.

Cybershack_logo

Airtasker App Review

Everybody has little jobs they hate doing, and would gladly pay somebody else to do - well now you can, with Airtasker. Airtasker allows you to set tasks, and get - and vet - people to carry them out for a fee.

The_fetch_logo

THE FETCH INTERVIEW: SYDNEY LOCAL, TIM FUNG

This week, Delphine Vuagnoux chats with Tim Fung, the founder and CEO of Airtasker, a start-up dedicated to making your life much easier.

Judge your staff not on the hours they do but on the work they deliver, say Intel and Dell.

Tech giants Intel and Dell have put their weight behind flexible work hours for staff, arguing there are signs the 9 to 5 work day will eventually give way to an approach to work where staff are judged on the work they deliver, not the hours they keep.

They also pointed to other technologies like LiquidSpace, Personal.com, Airtasker and Freelancer.com as tools businesses can use to tap into the work-from-home workforce.

Australian startup Airtasker, which we covered in April when it raised $1.5 million, announced a Business version of its service today.

Airtasker is billed as a Craiglist for chores, and can be used to have the site’s ‘runners’ complete tasks such as moving a fridge to performing at your wedding for a fee.

The new addition to the service is, as logic would suggest, geared at business users. Airtasker Business moves the service out of the realm of chores and can be used to find event staff and the like, and is most notably the company’s attempt to make Airtasker into a broader platform that could be rolled out into any number of other niches.

Itwire_logo

Outsource your iPhone 5 queuing to an Airtasker

Airtasker, a new online service that allows people to outsource everyday tasks, including standing in a long Apple queue. From just $50, an Airtasker runner will queue up at your nearest Apple store from 7am for you, so you can be one of the lucky few to get your hands on the new gadget while still getting on with your day. Or for the diehard Apple fanboys who love the excitement of a queue, they can even hire an Airtasker to run their errands for the day, while they stand in line.

Lost-at-e-minor-logo

Airtasker: The eBay for Odd Jobs

Need something done? From finding someone to pretend to be your girlfriend to picking relos up from the airport, AirTasker will find you the person for the job. This innovative new start-up is like an eBay for odd jobs, pairing those with spare time and a desire for extra cash with people who have jobs to do: from the mundane to the simply odd. I love it.

Sydney-based start-up Airtasker today opened its site to the public, offering people the chance to compete for small chores — like cleaning the house or doing the shopping — that someone in their neighbourhood needs done.

'Airtask Runners' will be paid up to $1000 depending on the price set by the person posting the task.

Delimiter

Airtasker startup wins $1.5m in funding

Airtasker, the brainchild of web entrepreneurs Fung and Jonathan Lui, is based on collaborative consumption – a concept fast gaining ground where community members share resources directly with each other online, including holiday accommodation (like AirBnB) and car rentals (like Zimride). Airtasker is pitched as a social marketplace where people can outsource everyday tasks to reliable ‘runners.’ The company’s mission is to connect people who need home errands and handyman jobs done, with people who want to earn some extra cash doing these errands and tasks in their local community.

Macworld_logo

Sydney man offers money to jump iPhone 5 queue

Using Airtasker, a service that lets users outsource chores, Chris F. is offering the public the chance to earn some money by queuing at the Sydney Apple Store “really early” to ensure he doesn’t “miss out and end up waiting for months”.

The task requires the winning bidder to “line up outside the Apple store at 7am sharp, then give me a buzz when you are at the front of the queue so I can rock up and purchase the iPhone 5,” Chris posted.

Gizmodo-logo

Get Paid To Queue Up For The iPhone 5 In Sydney

Airtasker is a service that lets you post a chore you want outsourced onto the site so people can bid on it. Say for example you need something delivered/brought to you, or you need someone to mow the lawn while you play Xbox. That’s what Airtasker is for.

Last year, it was successfully used to get someone to stand in line for the iPhone 4S for a whole week for a fee, and now it’s being used the same way once again.

saladsocial.com

Airtasker: The Ultimate Delegation Tool

Earlier in the year, up-and-coming company Airtasker was cleverly attached to the iPad 3 launch at the Sydney Apple Store. Like many other tech-hungry Australians, co-founder Tim Fung wanted to make sure he had his shiny new iPad by Friday, but didn’t have the time to wait in line overnight. Using Airtasker, Tim posted an ad which was shortly grabbed up by runner Steve P. Steve was given cash in hand to buy the iPad, an Airtasker t-shirt and a payment of $950 when the goods were in Tim’s eager hands.

Two startups – one in America, the other in Australia – show how the pervasive market produced by the mobile can aggregate demand and supply. Zaarly and Airtasker have both released smartphone apps that allow anyone to post requests for labour – someone to pick up the dry cleaning, paint a fence, clean a garden, etc. That request goes out to every person in the locale who has advertised their availability to do some work. A negotiation follows, as the prospective employer gets a number of inquiries, vets candidates, and agrees to a price. All of this activity happens through these apps, so it transpires quickly – anywhere from minutes to a few hours.

If you think that Australia is behind the times though, think again. We have covered Airtasker and their recent $1.5 million dollar funding round lead by Bridge Lane Capital before, but a recent chat with founders Jonathan Lui and Tim Fung a short five months into their new venture has started to shed some light on just how big this “local outsourcing” trend is going to become over the next 24 months.

Dropbox-logo

Australian New Express Daily

A feature article about Airtasker in the Chinese Australian newspaper, Australian New Express Daily.

Lifehacker_logo

Airtasker Expands to Brisbane and Melbourne!

Airtasker, the crowdsourcing service we’ve featured before, has expanded its coverage to Brisbane and Melbourne and rolled out its iPhone app.

According to Airtasker, more than 12,000 Australians have signed up since launch, and the service has seen more than $100,000 in transactions. Expanding beyond Sydney (the Melbourne option has been around for a few weeks) certainly positions it well to expand further (Perth is due to be added this month as well). If you’ve given it a try (either as a ‘runner’ or a hirer), tell us about it in the comments.

Cnetauslogo

App of the day

Welcome to CNET Australia's App of the Day, where you can see some of the coolest, silliest and most useful apps in action.

One thing that apps are great at is connecting you to people in your area. Airtasker is like a community noticeboard. Need someone to walk your dog or put together a bookcase or replace a light bulb that you just can't quite reach because you have a high-ceilinged house and you're only 5'2"? Airtasker has got you covered.

Shoestring_au

New Startup: AirTasker

You would think that being a founding entrepreneur behind successful businesses such as Amaysim and Joe Button and Circuit Club would keep Tim Fung pretty busy wouldn’t you? Obviously not busy enough as he has just recently co-founded and launched a new service “Airtasker” with fellow entrepreneur Jonathan Lui.

Airtasker is a community marketplace that connects people who are looking for help getting everyday tasks and errands completed, with a community of friendly people who are looking to earn some extra cash in a fun and flexible way. It works like this, you post a task via the website or mobile application describing what you need done, such as your dry cleaning etc. You also include how much you are willing to pay for the task. You then are notified when a “runner” has confirmed that they will help you out – you can then check out their profiles and reviews before making your final decision whether to use them or not.

Skynews.com.aulogo

Technology Behind Business, seg 1

As technology becomes an ever-more-critical component of doing business, this new program examines the latest trends and analyses the key IT concepts.

An Aussie start-up launched recently as an online errands and chores marketplace has been granted $1.5 million in funding.

The website, Airtasker, was launched in February and allows users to outsource everyday tasks to other members (dubbed "Runners") for cash.

The tasks range from the mundane, such as data entry and cleaning, to the outrageous, such as....

An Australian startup that incentivises and monetizes errands has launched its iPhone app having raised $1.5 million, just two months after launching.

Airtasker, which operates like Craigslist-for-chores, can be used to sell all manner of jobs to ‘runners’, who earn money by carrying out duties listed on the site.

Tasks being sold include a range of activity, such as removing a fridge, repairing clothes, moving house and, even, performing at a wedding.

Dailyaddictlogo

Airtasker to the rescue

Have you ever wished you could pay someone to do your random chores while you sleep/read/do fun things? Or maybe you want extra pocket money and have time on your side?

Listen up folks – there’s a new kid in town called AirTasker. This fantastically nifty site connects ‘AirTaskers’ (the time poor individuals who need assistance) with ‘Runners’ (people with mad skillz and the availability for casual slavery).

Surely one of the coolest tasks was when AirTasker Founder Tim Fung paid a dude to line up for a week outside the Apple store to get the first iPad in Australia. Q: Who the hell has time for that? A: Stephen Parke.

STEPHEN Parkes is first in line for a new iPad at the Apple store in Sydney but it's not because he actually wants one.

Instead jobs site Airtasker is keen to cash in on Apple’s cachet has paid the former truck driver $950 to wait there until Friday’s launch wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with its logo.

Airtasker.com is an online marketplace where people can bid for the right to earn cash for running day errands and completing everyday chores.

Cnetauslogo

Airtasker: like eBay for odd jobs

Described as being like eBay for odd jobs, Airtasker offers users an online marketplace that pairs people who have jobs with people who have spare time and the desire to earn some extra money. Tasks are listed by the "Tasker", with a detailed description about what is required, and "Runners" bid on the opportunity to complete the task. The Tasker can then choose the lowest bidder or the person with the best reputation on the site, depending on what they feel is more important to the task.

Beyond this initial connection, Airtasker serves as a private communications platform for Taskers and Runners, allowing them to communicate about the fine details of a job without the need to share more private information. To best serve this purpose, the Airtasker team has developed an iPhone app, with an Android app in the pipeline.

Sydney-based start-up Airtasker today opened its site to the public, offering people the chance to compete for small chores — like cleaning the house or doing the shopping — that someone in their neighbourhood needs done.

'Airtask Runners' will be paid up to $1000 depending on the price set by the person posting the task.

Last week Airtasker conducted a short trial with a group of invited participants. "We had plenty of tasks posted in a really small environment, and we just wanted to finalise all the processes," said co-founder Tim Fung. "It ran really, really smoothly. Heaps of people got lots of tasks done."

Lifehacker_logo

Airtasker Lets You Outsource Your Entire Life

Got a small task you need completed — let’s say assembling an IKEA bookshelf or cleaning your disgusting oven — and don’t have the time to do it yourself? Airtasker lets you advertise to find a local who might be willing to do the job for a small fee.

To use Airtasker, you simply post on the site, listing what you want done and what you’re willing to pay. Runners (the site’s term for people willing to volunteer for jobs) can then agree to perform the task, or haggle over the price.

Listing a task is free. Runners pay a $2 charge plus five per cent of the total fee. (During launch phrase, Runners can sign up for nothing if they promote the site via Twitter or Facebook.)